CSU-X1 Confocal Scanner Unit

Faster, Brighter, and More Versatile

The CSU-X1 is the high speed model of our CSU-series, which are widely recognized as the most powerful tools for live cell imaging.

  • World's fastest scanning speed of up to 2,000 fps
  • Microlens-enhanced Nipkow disk scanning
  • Filter wheel with six filter positions (in high-end model)
  • Exchangeable dichroic mirror block and emission filters
  • 3 configurations: 1-camera model, 2-camera model, bright field model
  • CO2 emissions reduced by 40%

LCA

Principles of the Microlens-enhanced Nipkow Disk Scanning Technology

A Nipkow spinning disk containing about 20,000 pinholes and a second spinning disk containing the same number of microlens to focus excitation laser light into each corresponding pinhole are mechanically fixed with a motor, and very rapidly raster scan the field of view with about 1,000 laser beams when rotated. The pinhole and microlens pattern are arranged in our proprietary design to optimize raster scan. Multi-beam scanning with the CSU-X1 not only increases scanning speed, but also results in significantly lower photobleaching and phototoxicity, because multiple excitation needs only a low level of laser power at the specimen to fully excite fluorescence.

nipkowdisk

Faster

  • The world's fastest scanning speed (up to 2,000fps in full-frame).
  • Yokogawa's proprietary filter wheel with six filter positions moves to the adjacent position at 33 ms, world's fastest speed.

Brighter

Doubled*1 excitation power efficiency with newly developed beam shaper lens, allows use of lower power lasers, and could reduce camera exposure time.

efficiency
















Triplicated*1 S/N by cutting the background noise by one third, expands capability of really low-light imaging. Significantly brighter*1 images by using most efficient dichroic mirrors and emission filters.

Optical path comfiguration


More Versatile -2nd Camera Option*1

You can either simultaneously image two different emission ranges with two cameras, or can selectively use one of the two cameras you installed which is most suitable for your current experimental requirement. For each camera port, you can select to install high-speed filter wheel (Option). In addition to standard C-mount adapter, adapters for 8X8 EMCCD camera and F-mount camera are available (Option).

More Versatile -Second Camera Port Option


More Versatile -Bright Field Path Option*2

It allows you to use one camera for both confocal imaging with the CSU-X1 and bright-field (non-confocal) imaging through the bypass light path.

More Versatile -Bright Field Path Option


More Versatile—Exchangeable mirror block and exchangeable filters

Easily exchangeable dichroic mirror block and emission filters.

More Versatile—Exchangeable mirror block and exchangeable filters

*1 It is necessary to use your choice of commercially available dichroic mirrors for simultaneous multicolor imaging.

*2 The Bright Field Option is not applicable to some microscopy set-up due to steric interference. Please inquire the applicability.

High-end model (6-position filter wheel)

High-end model (6-position filter wheel)

High-end model (12-position filter wheel)

High-end model (12-position filter wheel)

Basic model

Basic model

  Main unit *1 Main unit +
Brightfield*2
Main unit +
Secondcamera*2
Confocal scanning method Microlens-enhanced Nipkow disk scanning
Scanning speed Choice:1,500~5,000rpm (Standard)
1,500~10,000rpm (High-speed)*3
External synchronization Scan-speed synchronization through pulse signals
Input : TTL level 300Hz ~ 2KHz
Corresponding to Nipkow disk spinnig speed
1,500~10,000rpm*3
Excitation wavelangth 405~647nm
Second port - Brightfield Second camera
Dichroic mirror Option*4
Dichroic mirror switching Automatic 3CH
(Dichroic mirror block can be exchangeable)
Laser beam input AFC-connector (Polished 8 degree)
Optical fiber Yokogawa's standard Single-mode polarization-preserving fiber*5
Filter wheel
(Emission side)
Filter wheel with six filter positions
Emission filter Option*4
Operation panel Switch open / close of laser shutter
External control RS-232C interface via Control unit
Microscope mount C -mount adapter
Operating environment 15~40℃ / 20~75% RH
Power consumption
(main unit)
24VDC 1A max.
Power consumption
(AC adapter)
Input:100 up to 240VAC±10%, 50 or 60Hz±3Hz, 75Wmax.
Output:24VDC 2.5Amax.
External dimension *6 175(W)×328.5(H)×301.5(L)mm 175(W)×328.5(H)×301.5(L)mm 175(W)×328.5(H)×301.5(L)mm
Weight*7 8.9kg 11.7kg 13.0kg

*1 Supplied with a control unit ( for filter wheel ) and a filter wheel.
*2 Supplied with two control units ( one each for filter wheel and for bright field ) and a filter wheel.
*3 Option.
*4 Filters are not included ( Excitation filter , Emission filter ,Dichroic mirror ) . Please inquire as you need.
*5 Supplied with each CSU-X1 main unit.
*6 Excluding protruding parts. Including filter wheel.

  Main unit *1 Main unit +
Brightfield*2
Main unit +
Secondcamera*2
Confocal scanning method Microlens-enhanced Nipkow disk scanning
Scanning speed Choice:1,500~5,000rpm (Standard)
1,500~10,000rpm (High-speed)*3
External synchronization Scan-speed synchronization through pulse signals
Input : TTL level 300Hz ~ 2KHz
Corresponding to Nipkow disk spinnig speed
1,500~10,000rpm*3
Excitation wavelangth 405~647nm
Second port - Brightfield Second camera
Dichroic mirror Option*4
Dichroic mirror switching Automatic 3CH
(Dichroic mirror block can be exchangeable)
Laser beam input AFC-connector (Polished 8 degree)
Optical fiber Yokogawa's standard Single-mode polarization-preserving fiber*5
Filter wheel
(Emission side)
Filter wheel with 12 filter positions
Emission filter Option*4
Operation panel Switch open / close of laser shutter
External control RS-232C interface via Control unit
Microscope mount C -mount adapter
Operating environment 15~40℃ / 20~75% RH
Power consumption
(main unit)
24VDC 1A max.
Power consumption
(AC adapter)
Input:100 up to 240VAC±10%, 50 or 60Hz±3Hz, 75Wmax.
Output:24VDC 2.5Amax.
External dimension *6 258(W)×329.8(H)×213.4(L)mm 259(W)×374.3(H)×248(L)mm

309.8(W)×329.8(H)×392(L)mm

Weight*7 7.8kg 10.6kg 12.2kg

*1 Supplied with a control unit ( for filter wheel ) and a filter wheel.
*2 Supplied with two control units ( one each for filter wheel and for bright field ) and a filter wheel.
*3 Option.
*4 Filters are not included ( Excitation filter , Emission filter ,Dichroic mirror ) . Please inquire as you need.
*5 Supplied with each CSU-X1 main unit.
*6 Excluding protruding parts. Including filter wheel.

  Main unit *1 Main unit +
Brightfield*2
Main unit +
Secondcamera*2
Confocal scanning method Microlens-enhanced Nipkow disk scanning
Scanning speed Choice:1,500~5,000rpm (Standard)
1,500~5,000rpm (High-speed)*3*4
1,500~10,000rpm (High-speed)*3*4
External synchronization Option*4
Excitation wavelangth 405~647nm
Second port

-

Brightfield Second camera
Dichroic mirror Option*5
Dichroic mirror switching Manual 1CH
(Dichroic mirror block can be exchangeable)
Laser beam input AFC-connector (Polished 8 degree)
Optical fiber Yokogawa's standard Single-mode polarization-preserving fiber*6
Filter wheel
(Emission side)
-
Emission filter Option*5
Operation panel Switch open / close of laser shutter
External control -*4
Microscope mount C -mount adapter
Operating environment 15~40℃ / 20~75% RH
Power consumption
(main unit)
24VDC 1A max.
Power consumption
(AC adapter)
Input:100~240 VAC ±10% ,50 or 60Hz 、75W max.
Output : 24VDC 2.5A max.
External dimension *6 175(W)×328.5(H)×213.4(L) mm 259(W)×373(H)×213.4(L)mm

308.5(W)×328.5(H)×213.4(L)mm

Weight*7 7.5kg 10.0kg 10.0kg

*1 Supplied with a control unit ( for filter wheel ) and a filter wheel.
*2 Supplied with two control units ( one each for filter wheel and for bright field ) and a filter wheel.
*3 Option.
*4 Requires control unit for rotation speed control and external synchronization.
*5 Filters are not included ( Excitation filter , Emission filter ,Dichroic mirror ) . Please inquire as you need.
*6 Supplied with each CSU-X1 main unit.
*7 Excluding protruding parts.

Control unit・Filter Wheel

Control unit
Type for 6-position filter wheel (F1) for 12-position filter wheel (F2) for bright field (B1)
Operating condition 15~40℃ 20~75%RH
Power consumption Input : 100 up to 240VAC ± 10%, 50 or 60Hz, 200VAmax
External dimension
(mm)
213(W)×132(H)×438(L) mm
Weight( 5.2 kg 5.2 kg 5.1 kg

 

6-position filter wheel for CSU-X1
Operatimg condition 15~40℃ 20~75%RH
Power consumption -
External dimension 112(W)×226(D)×100(H)
Weight 1.9 kg

 

12-position filter wheel for CSU-X1
Operatimg condition 15~40℃ 20~75%RH
Power consumption -
External dimension 154(W)×98(D)×154(H)
Weight 2.4 kg

Comparison between target and referenced product

Comparison between target and referenced product

  Target Product: CSU-X1 Referenced product: CSU22+Filter Wheel
Energy (MJ) CO2Emissions (kg) NOxEmissions (g) SOxEmissions (g) Energy (MJ) CO2Emissions (kg) NOxEmissions (g) SOxEmissions (g)
Raw materials 2,335.5 132.5 337.1 130.1 2,610.0 148.0 374.9 147.1
Components 10,510.2 494.5 1,423.4 452.8 15,329.2 728.1 2,061.7 671.7
Machiningand assembly 1,542.9 68.7 214.1 56.8 2,259.8 100.7 313.6 83.1
Logistics 2,717.7 185.5 210.8 471.1 3,211.7 218.9 252.3 553.9
Consumption 36,713.5 1,635.9 5,094.8 1,351.5 66,087.0 2,944.8 9,171.0 1,126.4
Disposal -569.9 -31.9 -75.7 -33.6 -612.8 -34.5 -81.2 -37.4
Total 53,249.8 2,485.3 7,204.4 2,428.8 88,884.8 4,106.0 12,092.2 3,851.5
functional factor 40.1% 39.5% 40.4% 36.9%  

 Note: Value of the referenced product is calculated based on the functional factor. Functional factor:2.16

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Carl Zeis

Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH
(product name: Cell Observer SD)


Intelligent Imaging Innovations

Intelligent Imaging Innovations  
(product name: Marianas and VIVO)


Nikon

Nikon Instruments Inc.  
(North and South America)

Nikon Instruments Europe B.V.  
(Europe)

Nikon Corporation  
(Asia except for Japan and Oceania)
 



 

Vue générale:

To investigate interactive dynamics of the intracellular structures and organelles in the stomatal movement through live imaging technique, a CSU system was used to capture 3-dimensional images (XYZN) and time-laps images (XYT) of guard cells.

Vue générale:

In the fertilization and early embryonic development process, various events are spatiotemporally controlled, and many events are connected in the cause-effect relations toward the final goal of ontogenesis. To understand the mechanism of this process, conventional experimental techniques by fixing and destruction of the cells have limitations. If this process can be observed over time and the development process can be continued after the observation, it will open a new era in the Genetics research. A mammalian developmental biology researcher, Dr. Kazuo Yamagata, established such technique by using the CSU system.
He successfully imaged mouse embryos over a long period of time, from the post-fertilization through to the blastocyst stage, to acquire approximately 60,000 of 3D confocal images. Thereafter, the embryos were transferred to a recipient mouse, and the pups were born all normally, grew healthy, and were capable of reproduction; a firm evidence that this early embryo imaging technique does not adversely affect the process of full-term development. The high speed image acquisition and extremely low excitation light unique for the CSU system enabled greatly reduced phototoxicity and realized intensive but damage-free long time observation. Only by using this technology which does no harm on the embryonic development, it is possible to “utilize the same embryo after intensive analysis by imaging” , and thus to investigate cause- and-effect relationship of various early stage phenomena and their influence on the development.

Experimental flow
Movie example

Figure : The long-time, multi-dimensional live cell imaging on early stage embryos does not affect the process of ontogenesis.
(a) Experimental flow
(b) Movie example: Images were acquired at 7.5-minute intervals over approximately 70 hours.
      This figure shows extracted images at 2-hour intervals.
    Each image is the maximum intensity projection of a total of 51 images in the Z-axis direction.
    Green:Spindle (EGFP-α‒tubulin), Red:Nucleus (H2B-mRFP1)
 

Experimental conditions
Total time 70 hours
Interval 7.5 min/stack
Z-axis slices 51 sections (at 2μm intervals)
Channel 3(DIC, EGFP, mRFP1)
Position 6(Total 72 embryos)
Laser power(Measured at objective lens) 488nm (0.281 mW), 561nm (0.225 mW)


Data: Kazuo Yamagata, PhD., Laboratory for Genomic Reprogramming,Center for Developmental Biology, Riken


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Vue générale:

The neuronal network is a computing system that transforms input to output. This computation involves complex nonlinear processes through polysynaptic feedforward and feedback microcircuitry, and thus cannot be addressed either with isolated neuron responses or averaged multineuronal responses. Functional multineuron calcium imaging (fMCI) is promising to solve this problem.
The fMCI is a large-scale recording technique that simultaneously monitors the firing activity of more than a thousand neurons through their somatic Ca2+ signals.
Because of several advantages, including i) simultaneous recording from numerous neurons, ii) single-cell resolution, iii) identifiable location of recorded neurons, and iv) detection of non-active neurons during the observation period, fMCI attracts attention as a new-generation large-scale recording method.
In vitro fMCI is made more sophisticated by using multipoint ilumination and scanning with the CSU in combination with low-intensity lasers and an EM-CCD (electron-multiplying charge-coupled device) camera.
This CSU system allows to achieve ultra-high-speed and high-resolution fMCI in hippocampal slices; the Ca2+ fluorescent intensity of a large number of neurons can be monitored at the speed of up to 2,000 frames per second. This is one of the applications that make best use of the high-speed performance of the CSU Confocal Scanner Unit.

fMCI

Data: Yuji Ikegaya, PhD, Associate Professor at University of Tokyo Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

 


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Vue générale:

Faster, Brighter, and More Versatile
Confocal Scanner Unit

Vue générale:

Time-lapse imaging : Early stage mouse embryo

Following the injection of mouse embryos with mRNA, nearly 25,000 multicolor and multilayer confocal images of the embryos were acquired over 48 hour period as they developed to the blastocysts stage.Thereafter, they were transferred to a recipient mouse that gave birth to healthy pups, each of which developed normally and had full reproductive capability.This is firm evidence that long-term, multi-dimensional confocal imaging with CSU causes no harm to a delicate specimen such as an early stage embryo.

Early stage mouse embryo

Time lapse (MIP)  |  Full size movie Play

Measurement condition
Z-sections/
stack
100um
(1um/101slices)
Fluorescent probe 488nm:
H2B-EGFP
561nm:
mCherry-MBD-NLS
Pinhole 50um
Objective lens 60x silicone
Total time 48 hours
(Interval:10mins)
 Early stage mouse embryo

Excerpts from Time lapse (MIP of chromosome)

Data:  Kazuo Yamagata, Ph.D., Center for Genetic Analysis of Biological Responses, The Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University

Vue générale:

List of Selected Publications : CSU-X1

Vue générale:

In recent years, obese adipose tissue is attracting attention as an “active metabolic organ” that causes various diseases. Especially, visceral obesity and inflammation play a central role in metabolic syndrome. It was found that visceral obesity caused remodeling of adipose tissues based on chronic inflammation, and insulin resistance was occurred, which eventually leads to development of arteriosclerosis lesion, and cause new blood vessel events.
To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of pathological conditions consisted by the complicated and multi-cellular abnormal interactions in remodeling tissues, an “in vivo molecular imaging” based on the CSU system was developed.
By using this technique, it becomes possible to precisely evaluate the three-dimensional changes in the structures in living tissue, and the multi-cellular dynamics in vivo with high time and spatial resolutions.

 

Images of the remodeling of adipose tissue in live animals

Figure 1: Images of the remodeling of adipose tissue in live animals
a: Conventional adipose tissue specimen (lean, db/+ mouse)
b & c: Images of a white adipose tissue of an 8-week-old thin mouse (lean, db/+)
d: Adipose tissue of an 8-week-old obese animal (obese, db/db)
 

 

An example of real-time multi-color movie of microcirculation in mouse

Figure 2: An example of real-time multi-color movie of microcirculation in mouse, which clearly shows dynamic movement and interactions among leucocytes, platelets, macrophages and endothelium.

 

Application of “ in vivo molecular imaging” on various organs

Figure 3: Application of “ in vivo molecular imaging” on various organs
(Blood flow images of a: Skeletal muscle, b: Liver, c & d: Kidney glomeruli)

Data: Satoshi Nishimura M.D., Ph.D www.invivoimaging.net
Dept. of Cardiovascular Medicine, Translational Systems Biology and Medicine Initiative,
The University of Tokyo & PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency


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Rapports technique
The World as Seen from Cells
(rd-te-r06002-001)
2.2 MB

Vue d’ensemble

    Vue générale:

    YOKOGAWA proprietary Spinning Disk technology enables fast real-time confocal imaging for applications such as high-speed 3D and long-term live cell imaging. These quantifiable imaging analysis are essential tools for modern precision drug discovery.
     

    Vue générale:

    Over past 20 years, YOKOGAWA proprietary Spinning Disk Confocal technology has been widely used as an indispensable imaging tool among top researchers. The technology enables faster live-cell observation with clearer and less photo-bleaching imaging.

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