Analizadores de Procesos

Process analyzers are on-line tools for industrial process analytics. They are used to determine the chemical composition or physical properties of substances involved in industrial processes. They enable process optimization, asset protection, and compliance with environmental regulations.

With one of the most comprehensive families of sensors and on-line analyzers for pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, combustion oxygen, humidity, liquid and gas density and process gas chromatography, Yokogawa is recognized as a world leader in the field of analytical equipment. Accurate, repeatable measurement is the key to obtaining optimal results in your process, and Yokogawa's diagnostic-based analytical instrumentation offers the flexibility to meet a range of individual requirements. Whether for liquid or gas applications, our analyzers can resolve even the most demanding situations. Yokogawa's leadership in process analytics helps to protect the environment by reducing energy consumption and CO2 emissions. 

  • Real-time gas analysis enhances efficiency, safety, throughput, product quality, and ensures environmental compliance.

  • Liquid analyzers are used for monitoring process chemistry including water quality, providing process optimization and control.

  • Analytical solutions for gas and liquid measurements to support product refinement, process efficiency, and safety. 

  • Our analytical services include installation and construction, startup and commissioning, and training services. 

Overview:

Specialized online analyzers, standardized sampling systems and other advancements are helping process plants move more measurements from offline in labs to online in-situ. The move from remote analyzer shelters to a pipe-centric approach where analyzers are installed at or near the sample tap will further cut costs, reduce maintenance and improve process control.

Medios de Comunicación
Overview:

Motor fuels are complex products. Various diesel fuel and gasoline grades are prepared from a large range of individual blending components whose individual properties may be extremely variable over time. Each day, refiners must determine the blend recipe based on the properties, value and availability of those components, as well as the target specifications for the product. Once that is done, the operational challenge is to verify that the blended product delivered to the pipeline actually meets those contractually defined specifications.

Overview:

You can test the ISC converter by simulating a conductivity reading using an ISC40 sensor.

  • You will need:
    • A known working ISC40 sensor.
    • A piece of wire
    • One or two decade box/resistance sources.
  • Connect sensor wires 13-17 to analyzer.
  • Connect wire through the toroidal sensor and connect the wire to the decade box. Be sure not to cross the leads or wire.
  • Use second decade box resistance source to simulate the temp sensor.
    • If you don’t have a second resistance source you can just connected the temp sensor wires 11&12 from the sensor, you will just not be able to vary the input readings.
  • Write down the Cell Constant, change it to 1.000
  • Set the temperature to the reference temperature or: Write down the Temp. Compensation method, and change it to “None.”
  • The Conductivity reading should be 1/R where R = Resistance on the decade box.
  • If you need higher resistance than the decade box you can use multiple loops of wire through the sensor.  The reading will be L2 / R where L = Number of loops, R = Resistance on the decade box.
  • Return all settings to the original settings when finished.
FAQ
Overview:
  • With an Ohm meter check the following wires on the ISC40G sensor cable:
    • 11 to 12 (Pt1000 or Thermistor)
    • 13 to 17 – Sensor coil – expect low resistance. If unstable or above 100Ω it is bad.
    • 15 to 16 - Sensor coil – expect low resistance. If unstable or above 100Ω it is bad.
    • 14 to every other wire – The ohm meter should stay off scale. If the ohm meter moves/jumps/reads anything that is bad.

 

Simulating a conductivity reading on an ISC convertor.

  • You will need:
    • A known working ISC Converter
    • A piece of wire
    • One or two decade box/resistance sources.
  • Connect sensor wires 13-17 to analyzer.
  • Connect wire through the toroidal sensor and connect the wire to the decade box. Be sure not to cross the leads or wire.
  • Use second decade box resistance source to simulate the temp sensor.
    • If you don’t have a second resistance source you can just connected the temp sensor wires 11&12 from the sensor, you will just not be able to vary the input readings.
  • Write down the Cell Constant, change it to 1.000
  • Set the temperature to the reference temperature or: Write down the Temp. Compensation method, and change it to “None.”
  • The Conductivity reading should be 1/R where R = Resistance on the decade box.
  • If you need higher resistance than the decade box you can use multiple loops of wire through the sensor.  The reading will be L2 / R where L = Number of loops, R = Resistance on the decade box.
  • Return all settings to the original settings when finished.
Overview:

Click the link at the top of the page to download the DO400 Manual.

Overview:

How to startup a new sensor, or how to replace the Membrane Cap and Electrolyte.

 

Startup of a new Oxygold G sensor:

The Oxygold G sensor is shipped dry with a protective cap over the end of the Membrane Cartridge.

CAUTION: The electrolyte should not be allowed to touch your skin or clothing. Use Personal Protective Equipment such as gloves and protective eyeware when working with the electrolyte.

 

1. Inspect the new sensor for damage during shipment. 

2. Remove the membrane cartridge and rinse it once with a small amount of the OXYGOLD G electrolyte. 

3. Using the installed pipette dispense 1.5 ml. of the OXYGOLD G electrolyte into the membrane cartridge.

4. Maintain the membrane cartridge in a vertical position to prevent spilling the electrolyte, and insert the sensor shaft and screw it in place. Rinse off any electrolyte that may remain on the exterior of the sensor. 

5. The sensor must now polarize to remove the oxygen that is dissolved in the electrolyte. This can be accomplished by connecting the sensor to a transmitter and turning on the power. It will take 2 hours for the polarization to be completed. Normally the next step will be to perform an air calibration so you should leave the sensor in air during this polarization period. 

6. Perform an air calibration. 

Replacing the membrane cartridge and electrolyte

1. Remove the membrane cartridge and discard any remaining electrolyte. Do not attempt to polish or even wipe the anode and cathode of the sensor. 

2. If the membrane cartridge is being replaced discard the old cartridge and follow the steps below with the new cartridge. If it is being reused, follow the steps below with the old cartridge. 

3. Rinse the membrane cartridge once with a small amount of the OXYGOLD G electrolyte.

4. Using the installed pipette dispense 1.5 ml. of the OXYGOLD G electrolyte into the membrane cartridge.

5. Maintain the membrane cartridge in a vertical position to prevent spilling the electrolyte, and insert the sensor shaft and screw it in place. Rinse off any electrolyte that may remain on the exterior of the sensor. 

6. The sensor must now polarize to remove the oxygen that is dissolved in the electrolyte. This can be accomplished by connecting the sensor to a transmitter and turning on the power. It will take 2 hours for the polarization to be completed. Normally the next step will be to perform an air calibration so you should leave the sensor in air during this polarization period. 

7. Perform an air calibration. 

We also have a video you can watch of the OxyGold G startup process. Click the link at the top of this page.

 

 

Overview:

The password to access the maintenance and commissioning area is 77

Overview:

Use the link at the top of the page to download a compressed (ZIP) file containing the GS Sheet and Manual for the SC150.

Overview:

The difference is the temperature sensor. The SC41 has a Ni100 temperature element and the SC42 has a PT1000 temperature element. PT1000 is a better temperature element, but some old electronics will not accept a PT1000 temperature element, so the SC41 is still available.

Overview:

Soak the sensor in 5 - 10% Hydrochloric acid (HCl) in water solution. for 5 - 10 minutes, then rinse. If you have trouble finding 5 - 10% HCL you can buy muriatic acid at a building supply house and it is usually 20 - 30% HCL. Check the label. Dilute it with tap water to get something close to 10%. 

BE VERY CAREFUL WHEN DILUTING THE ACID. USE PROTECTIVE CLOTHING (GLOVES, FACE SHIELD ETC.) ALWAYS ADD ACID TO WATER, NEVER ADD WATER TO ACID.

Overview:

If you forgot the password to your FLXA Transmitter you can use the password #PW123# - this will allow you go into the menus. Remember to change or remove the password.

Overview:

To test the conductivity input do the following: 

  1. Write down the cell constant and change it to 1.00 (this is not mandatory, it makes the math easier) 
  2. Place a jumper wire between 13 to 14 and another one on 15 to 16 (not necessary on the DC400/402) 
  3. Place a resistance between the 13/14 and 15/16 connection. If the unit is set in resistivity it should match the resistance. If it is displaying conductivity it should read Y where Y = (cell constant)/(input resistance) and the units are Siemens. So if the result is 0.005 Siemens this equals 5 milliSiemens.and 0.000005 Siemens equals 5 microSiemens. 

Remember to set the cell constant back to the original value if you changed it.

Overview:

There is no way to "turn off" an unused input on a DC402. If you leave the terminals open you will get error messages. 

Connect a simulated sensor to the unused input to clear the errors. Use a resistor on 11-12 to simulate the temp sensor, 1000 ohms for PT1000, 100 Ohms for PT100. Simulate the same type temperature sensor that the other channel is using. 

Use a resistance to simulate the cell that gives a conductivity reading within the range, usually 1000 ohms between 14-15 will work. Once you have connected the resistors the input the errors will clear.

FAQ
AV8C Channel reset code
(KB-000-0410)
Overview:

You can use code 58 to reset a single AV8C channel. 

First scroll the display to the channel you would like to cycle, then enter code 58. 

Overview:

Here's a link to download the AV8G Manual. 

Overview:

The password to get in all the maintenance and commissioning menus is 16 

FAQ
ZR22S: Option "B" Adder
(KB-000-0438)
Overview:

This is the Japanese GS sheet, containing a number of options we rarely sell here in the US. Contact Support at 800-524-7378 or support@us.yokogawa.com for price and delivery information. 

 

Overview:

If your analyzer has been up and running properly but when you try to calibrate you receive an "alm 10" code, then clean the detector and try again. 

 

See the below for cleaning instructions

FAQ
HA400 Instruction Manual
(KB-000-0459)
Overview:

See link

Overview:

If you have set a password and have forgotten it you can use the password "MOON" to get into the configuration menu. Then you will be able to modify/view the password that is set in the unit. 

Note: if you have not set a password just hit enter on the screen and it will accept that as the password.

 

Overview:

Meter Checks:

  • Heater: 57-85Ω (typical is 62-67Ω)
    • Typical failure is Open or shorted
  • TC: if the probe is at room temperature -  less than 3Ω, in the stack and hot less than 100Ω (it is a type K Thermocouple)
    • Typical failure is open or shorted to the case.
  • Cell negative wire to the case. It should be a direct short to the case. If resistance is above 5Ω it can cause intermittent/erratic readings.

Cold junctions:

  • RTD type (red/black or red/white wire)
    • Resistance approx. 1100Ω at room temperature, no polarity (2 wire PT1000 RTD). Typical failure is Open or shorted.
  • Transistor type
    • Checks out like a diode. One direction is high resistance (typically in the MΩ) then the other direction will be open. Typical failure will have high resistance both directions or low resistance in both directions.

High Voltage Tests:

Use a 500Vdc Insulation Meter Checks (Aka: Megger). Be sure there are no wires attached to probe before doing this test.

  • TC + to the case. Should be >2MΩ
  • TC – to the case. Should be >2MΩ
  • Cold Junction + to the case. Should be >20MΩ
  • Cold Junction – to the case. Should be >20MΩ
  • Both sides of the heater to the case. Should be >2MΩ
  • If the O2 cell is removed you can also check the Cell positive to the case. It should be >2MΩ

Testing O2 cell:

  1. Perform a 2 point calibration. Check the cell resistance (under the magnifying glass button). Consider replacing the O2 cell if it is higher than 1000Ω. Higher resistance means the response time is reduced and can cause calibration errors if the response is very slow. 
  2. Remove the cell + & - wires from the channel card.
  3. Place a short between the Cell + & - on the channel card.
  4. Turn power off and on with the channel card power under maintenance and allow the channel to come up to temperature
  5. Note: Channel should read ~21% and the reading should be stable. If the unit comes up with a cell failure or the reading is erratic the problem is in the channel card.
  6. Apply Zero and/or Span gas (500 cc/Min). Measure the loose wires at the electronics.
  7. Span Gas (instrument Air) should read close to 0 mV (+/- 5 mV)
  8. Zero Gas Should read as follows:

        0.4% O2        84 mV’s (75-90 mV’s)
           1% O2        67 mV (55-70 mV’s)
           2% O2        52 mV’s (45-55 mV’s)

Troubleshooting

For a multichannel converter (AV550):

  1. Be sure that the heater and signal cables are landed on the correct channel card.  If the heaters are crossed it can cause this. Try swapping a working channel card with the channel in question. If a different card works properly it is a bad channel card.
  2. Swap probe to a working channel.  If it works on a new channel and not on the old channel the power unit is damaged.

Temperature low or not heating up:

  1. Reset the channel.
  2. If the probe fails to warm up turn off the channel.
  3. Unwire the Heater, TC, and CJ and perform the ohm meter check on the Heater, TC , and CJ.
  4. If you find a failure in one of the above, go to the back of the probe and check them inside the probe housing.
  5. If there is not failure in the probe housing, but there is one at the electronics the problem is in the cable.
  6. If all the values check out in the probe then you need to check out the electronics.
  7. Reconnect the wires from the heater, tc, and cj.
  8. Reset the analyzer/channel, measure the voltage going to the heater. It should be 60-120Vac (Voltage is a modulated voltage but can be measured as AC)
  9. If power is not present check the fuses.
  10. On the AV550 they are on the power unit (just above where the heater wires up). There are 2 fuses per channel.

High Oxygen Readings:

  1. Check for a leak in in the calibration system or cal line.
  2. Remove the fitting from the probe where the calibration gas is connected. Replace it with a pipe plug with Teflon tape. If the problem goes away the problem is a leak in the cal gas line to the probe or in the autocal system.
  3. If the reading is still high it could be a leak inside the probe between the cal gas inlet and the end of the probe by the cell. Remove O2 cell. Plug end of cal line (You can flip the o2 cell over, place a small piece of rubber in between the cell and flange and install the cell to plug off the line). Apply a approximately 1 PSI to the cal line, shut the pressure off and see if it holds pressure.
  4. Bad O2 cell
  5. Run calibration. If cell resistance is above 200Ω replace the cell.
  6. If you get a cal error replace the cell.
  7. Cracked O2 cell
  8. Run Calibration. Apply zero gas at 500 cc/min max. If reading is not stable or it is reading high it is likely the cell is cracked.

Low Oxygen Readings:

  1. Leak in calibration system (AutoCal system or Manual Calibration Panel). 
  2. Plug off cal line at the back of probe. If problem goes away find the leak in the zero cal gas side of the cal system. Zero Gas may be leaking past a valve into the cell.
  3. Bad O2 cell
  4. Run calibration. If cell resistance is above 200Ω replace the cell.
  5. If you get a cal error replace the cell.
  6. Excess hydrocarbons (fuel)
  7. O2 probes control at 750°C, If the process has excessive hydrocarbons (un-burnt fuel) they can burn on the tip of the probe consuming the oxygen at the tip of the probe and making the reading go low.
  8. Excess moisture in process
  9. If excessive moisture is in the process it can come in contact with the O2 probe (750°C) and cause steam right at the O2 cell. If you have excessive steam at the O2 cell it will read low, as well as possibly damage the O2 cell.

Erratic Reading:

  1. Be sure heater and signal wires are in separate conduits.
  2. Flow zero gas at 300-500 cc/min on probe.
    1. If reading continually drifts up the O2 cell is cracked.
  3. Perform a calibration
    1. If readings are unstable and calibration fails see cell troubleshooting.
Overview:

The part number you see on the channel card circuit board is not the part number for the channel card. It is the part number for the circuit board before any parts are installed. 

There are 2 versions on the channel card. 

If you look at your channel card you will see there are either 1 or 2 blue "boxes" on it. 

If you see 1 Blue box your channel card has common Isolation - the part number is AV55M-A1

If you see 2 Blue boxes your channel card has individual isolation - the part number is AV55M-B1

Overview:

The AV550 automatically turns off the power to the channel card when it is removed. You have to either cycle power to the whole unit, or use the channel card power. 

To get to the channel card power menu hit the Setup Key (wrench). See below: 

Select Maintenance 

Select Channel card power

Select the desired channel and enable. 

Overview:

You can use the password JAVAJAVA to get past the password screen. Make sure you go to the password menu change the password setting. 

Overview:

Yokogawa has been making Zirconia Oxygen Analyzers for over 30 years. The older O2 probes and analyzers used a transistor temperature sensor. The newer units use a PT1000 RTD. We discontinued the ZO21D probe and both the AV8G and ZA8C analyzers over 15 years ago. To make it easier for our customers who still had the older ZA8C and AV8G analyzers we added an option to allow them to order the ZR22G probes with the old style sensors already installed. Some customers are still ordering ZR22 Probes with the /ZR or /AV option (see the photo to the right). In many cases they are actually using them on AV550s or ZR402Gs but they have the analyzers set to “ZO21D” mode so that they will work with the old cold junction sensors. They were purchasing probes with the old sensor because they still had some ZA8C Analyzers or AV8G Analyzers in operation along with some of the newer ZR402s and AV550s.

Now the old style Cold Junction sensors are no longer manufactured, and we have not been able to locate another supplier.

These customers need to replace any ZA8Cs or AV8Gs they still have with ZR402s or AV550s.

The new Cold Junction sensor is a PT1000 RTD. It is available as a spare part. The part number is K9470BG - Cold Junction (RTD) for ZR22.

We have a limited stock of the ZO21D style cold junction sensors. The part number is E7042AU-J1, and the list price is $250.00. We will continued to sell them but they will be gone in a short time. The few customers that still have ZA8Cs or AV8Gs can purchase the parts but they need to plan to change to the ZR402 or AV550.

Identifying the Cold Junction Sensors

The Cold Junction sensor may be a PT1000 RTD or a Transistor Cold Junction sensor.

There are two styles of RTD that have been used. Both are PT1000:


The newer units have a PT1000 sensor with a Red & Black wire












 


The older units have a PT1000 sensor with a Red & White wire.









 




The Transistor sensor is mounted on a small metal bracket with 2 wires connected to one terminal and 1 wire connected to the other one.











 

For the ZR402G or AV550 with a PT1000 sensor set the Detector Setting to ZR22G.

For the ZR402G or AV550 with a Transistor sensor set the Detector Setting to ZO21C.

Overview:

If you forget the password you have set in one of these transmitters there are only 9 passwords that can be set. 

The password setting on the unit is a little difficult to understand. When you put a 3 digit code in service code 52 you are setting up 3 passwords, not just 1. The first digit is for the maintenance mode (calibration) The second digit is for the commissioning mode (when you hit the * key) The third digit is for the service menu (when you hit yes on the SERV menu under commissioning). 

Here are the password options: 

1 = 111
2 = 333
3 = 777
4 = 888
5 = 123
6 = 957
7 = 331
8 = 546
9 = 847 

So, and example:

if you setup a password of 1.2.3:

  • To calibrate you would have to enter 111 
  • When you hit the * key the password would be 333
  • To access the SERV menu the password would be 777

There are no bypass passwords, these are the only passwords available for the unit.

Overview:

If you have lost the password for your SC150 you can use password   #PW123#   to get into the menu. The next thing you should do is to reset the password.

Overview:

Most pH sensors with a glass membrane cannot be mounted upside down. To absorb the thermal expansion of the internal buffer solution there is always a sizeable air bubble inside the sensor. When the sensor is mounted upside down the reference element can lose contact with the electrolyte. The FU24 pH sensor from Yokogawa can be used in upside down application, because it has a special design that allows us to reduce the size of the air bubble. The PH18 sensor can be mounted upside down because it does not have a glass electrode or electrolyte.  

Overview:

Yokogawa offers the PH18 sensor. This sensor is nonglass and suitable for regular CIP and SIP cycles.

Overview:

In a dual input FLXA202 or FLXA21 analyzer you can use a HART Splitter to convert the HART® dynamic variables into current outputs or contact outputs. The model number is "1W-KFD2-HLC-EX1.D" and the description is "P+F HART Splitter." In the FLXA menu you can select which dynamic variables you like as "SV" "TV" and "FV."

Go to Commissioning>Advanced Setup>Communication>HART> then use the down arrow to select the SV, TV, and FV fields.

Overview:

Yokogawa's pH and conductivity sensors include a temperature sensor to allow for temperature compensation. The pH and conductivity sensors have a relatively large temperature mass and respond slowly to the changes in the process temperature. This is fine for temperature compensation or diagnostic uses but not for process control of the temperature. Process temperature sensors have a much lower mass and respond much quicker to temperature changes. Use those for process control, not the temperature sensor built into the pH or Conductivity sensor. 

Overview:

That is possible but not guaranteed. The 225 mm sensor body is longer, so it has more electrolyte. Often the reference electrode fails because the electrolyte is depleted as it diffuses through the reference junction into the process. With a higher volume of electrolye this process will take a longer time. This is not the only failure mode so you can still have a short lifetime due to another cause.

Overview:

Often, Instrumentation technicians like to shorten cables to match the installation. This is strongly discouraged with Analytical Sensors. Yokogawa has designed cables with a special layer of conductive plastic to ensure maximum noise immunity. This layer can be very difficult to remove. If done improperly the shortened cables will often give intermittent problems. They may show noisy signals, signals that jump when the cables are touched or moved, or may not work at all. This is often difficult to diagnose and may lead to customers replacing the entire system because they lose confidence in the integrity of the analyzer. For this reason we recommend that the cables be left at their original length. Any unused cable can be coiled up and immobilized using Plastic Wire-ties or tape to keep it out of the way and prevent wind or weather from causing it to move.

Keep in mind that pH analyzers are measuring a voltage signal through the glass of the pH sensor. This sensor may have over 1,000 MegOhms of resistance. In these conditions the cables must be perfect to keep the voltage signal from leaking away before it reaches the Transmitter. Even the oil from your fingers in the wrong place can short out this signal and cause errors. 

FAQ
Overview:

Error 130 & 131 are display errors. The PH450 calibrates the display each time it powers up. Error 130 or 131 means this calibration failed. Cycle the power to the unit and allow it to calibrate the display again. If after 6 times the error is still present, the unit will need to be returned to our Repair Center. Call 800-524-7378 and ask for the repair center, then ask for a Return Authorization number, or email us at support@us.yokogawa.com and ask for a Return Authorization number. Include the following information, Company name, billing and shipping addresses, a Contact name, phone number and email address, the complete model number and serial number, and a description of the problem.

Overview:

Yes. The Cation Differential pH and ORP sensors have a glass electrode that needs a 2 point calibration performed regularly. Because of the Cation Reverence electrode you must use special buffers with a constant sodium ion concentration. This calibration is needed to compensate for the change in response of the glass electrodes. These changes are normal and are caused by aging or chemical attack, and they are accelerated at higher temperatures. 

Overview:

A tiny crack in the membrane of a glass electrode is not always visible to the naked eye. Frequent shocks may create cracks in the glass that cause measurment errors. These cracks will cause the analyzer to read 0 mV and the analyzer interprets that to a reading near pH 7. in many process the setpoint is near pH 7. This means a cracked pH sensor can cause an inaccurate reading that is near the setpoint, and it may not be noticed quickly. This can be a critical and dangerous situation.   Without additional diagnostic, the error will not be detected until the process is out of control.

Yokogawa's Transmitters have an impedeance check function. The analyzer checks the impedance of pH (and reference) sensors via the solution ground. The Transmitter can be set to generate an alarm if the impedance limits are exceeded. 

Overview:

It is very important that the cables maintain a very high impedance. If any moisture penetrates the cable the impedance will drop and the cable will short out the voltage generated by the pH sensors. This will cause errors or a total loss of measurement.  This can also occur if the cables are exposed to water for long periods of time. To insure that the pH measurement remains accurate protect the cables and the back of the pH sensors from exposure to moisture. 

Overview:

Generally we state that the pH analyzer is as accurate as the care that is given to the device allows.

  • With lots of care you can achieve 0.05 pH accuracy.
  • With normal care you achieve 0.1 pH
  • Without care the measuring error can be pH 0.5 or more.

 

The official specifications from the GS Sheet are shown below:

Overview:

Most of our pH sensors have a noble metal solution ground and our transmitters measures two values: 1.  the voltage between this solution ground, or liquid earth sensor and the pH sensor, and 2. the voltage between this solution ground, or liquid earth sensor and  the reference cell. This allows the transmitter to use this voltage to calculate the ORP value. The beauty of this solution is that with one combination pH/ORP sensor and one Transmitter you can get both pH and ORP values. 

Overview:

The PH150 and SC150 were discontinued in 2004. The Manual and General Specification sheet are no longer available on Yokogawa's website. Use this link to download a zip file containing both documents.

Overview:

The TM20 pH meter was discontinued over 20 years ago, but the manual is still available. 

If you have trouble downloading it, send us an email at support@us.yokogawa.com or call 800-524-7378.

FAQ
PH Sensor Cleaning
(KB-000-0380)
Overview:

Cleaning pH Sensors

Basic Steps 

  • Rinse electrode in clean water
  • Clean by immersing the electrodes in a cleaning solution (see below). 
  • Rinse Again
  • Check with buffers

Cleaning Solutions:

If you know a specific way to clean the sensors for your process use that method. Often Hot Water is sufficient. In many cases 5 - 10% Hydrochloric acid (HCl) in water will work for stubborn deposits. If you have trouble finding 5 - 10% HCL you can buy muriatic acid at a building supply house and it is usually 20 - 35% HCL. Check the label. Dilute it with tap water to get something close to 10%. 

BE VERY CAREFUL WHEN DILUTING THE ACID. USE PROTECTIVE CLOTHING (GLOVES, FACE SHIELD ETC.) ALWAYS ADD ACID TO WATER, NEVER ADD WATER TO ACID (this can cause the water to boil and splash acid out of the container).

Cleaning Process:

First, rinse off the electrodes/sensor in just plain water. To remove any heavy process coating use a soft brush, taking care not to damage the electrodes. Greasy or sticky deposits may respond to a mild detergent, but limit the time the sensor is exposed to keep the detergent from penetrating the reference junction. Rinse well after using detergent.

Most process deposits will be removed if you immerse the electrodes in an acid cleaning solution for 5 - 10 minutes, agitating them regularly. Use a soft brush to clean off any remaining coating deposits. If the coating is extreme this could take longer.

Now rinse the electrodes thoroughly again with clean water to remove any detergent or acid that would contaminate the buffer solution used.

Dry and place the electrodes in a new clean pH buffer solution and allow it to stabilize. If the displayed value is within ±0.03 pH of the buffer value, the electrodes are clean and do not require calibration. Put the system back on line. If the value is outside the tolerance (± 0.03 pH), then a two point buffer calibration is required.

Overview:

Yes you can, but we do not recommend this method. A pH sensor has a reference electrode that has a low impedance to the process. If the process suffers from common mode voltages or ground loops it will be difficult to measure the pH accurately. These cause current to flow through the path of least resistance. If there is no better choice this will be the reference electrode. This results in measurment errors. (Ohm’s law: 1 uA through 10 kΩ is 10 mV is 0.2 pH) and can result in damage to the reference electrode.

With a solution ground the path of least resistance becomes the solution ground and the pH sensor does not suffer from ground loop currents.

Also the famous Yokogawa impedance monitoring features work properly only when we have a solution ground. If you want to connect a sensor without a solution ground, then you can connect a jumper from the reference input terminal to the liquid earth input terminal. On Yokogawa Transmitters this is usually terminals 13 and 14. 

Overview:

The short answer to this question is NO.

But, there is a long answer that will give you another option.

Yokogawa has created a Submersible Sensor Kit (part number M1289XT) for the FU20 pH sensors - M1289XU for the FU24 sensor). It is also known as the “Dangler.” 

 

It consists of a short enclosed section with threads that fit the threads on the back of the FU20/24 sensor. The enclosed section is large enough to contain the strain relief on the standard FU20/24 or the connector on the Variopen version. There is a compression fitting that the cable passes through that is designed to make a watertight seal with the cable. Once installed in the Dangler you CAN simply drop the FU20/24 into your tank or open channel.

Overview:

Yes, the input module can be changed in the Converter. 

 

See the FAQ:

Which Input Module do I order for my FLXA21/202 analyzer?

Overview:

This is a well-known pH problem that we call Diffusion Potential. If the sensor junction is partially plugged the electrical contact between electrolyte and process is not good. This results in a high diffusion potential and an error in the measurement. The chemical composition of the pH buffers is different from the process solution. So when the junction is partially plugged it creates a diffusion potential that adds to the potential from the pH buffers, and you calibrate for this total potential. When you return the senors to the process the diffusion potential changes causing a shift in the pH value displayed by the Transmitter.

An easy check is to look at the diagnostic information on the pH analyser: Is the Asymmetry Potential high or the Slope low? If either occurs then most likely you have this problem. You can try cleaning the sensor to reduce the diffusion potential.

Another cause can be the infamous ground loop current. This can occur when you use pH sensors without a liquid earth connection.

Overview:

NO! 

Sensors that are not used need to be stored in a solution that guarantees that the sensor is ready for use. When the sensor is stored in pure water the salt will be washed out of the junction of the reference cell. This causes the sensor to fail. 

Yokogawa uses the same salt concentration in the wet pocket (during shipment and storage) as is used inside the sensor. For combination sensors we add a trace of acid to keep the Glass membranes active. So, the best method is to keep the wet pocket that was shipped with the sensor and store the sensor in the wet pocket when not in use.

Overview:

Yes and No. 

Yes - after cleaning you need to verify that the analyzer is reading correctly. The easiest way is to see how it reads when placed in 2 pH buffer soltuions. This is what you do when calibrating. 

No - If the readings are within the specifications (+/- 0.01pH, +/- 1 mV for ORP) in the pH buffers a full calibration is not needed. 

Another way to verify that the readings are correct is to take a process sample and accurately determing the pH or ORP value using another method. This may be a Handheld or Portable analyzer, or you may take a sample to the lab. Be aware that there are many processes that will read differently after the sample sits in a sample bottle for a period of time. For those samples the lab reading will be different from the On-line analyzer. 

Overview:

Yes, the SENCOM Module in these sensors allows a Modbus Master to
connect using Modbus RTU protocol and access the following data:

  • pH
  • Temperature compensated pH
  • ORP
  • pH compensated ORP
  • rH
  • Temperature
  • Junction resistance value
  • Sensor details (Model, Serial Number, production date)
  • Sensor calibration data (zero, slope, temperature offset)
  • Sensor status signals (e.g. Glass impedance detection)

As shown in the diagram above, our pH is calculated by subtracting value B from value A. To do this the B value is stored inside the sensor and can be displayed independently at any time. Since ORP is simply the value of B, we can easily display both pH (A-B) and ORP (B) without any issues.

FAQ
PH150 Forgot Password?
(KB-000-0209)
Overview:


The PH150 allows the use of passwords to limit access to the Calibration functions and access to the Configuration functions. If these functions have been protected with a password and the password is not available there is a way to bypass the protection and change or remove the passwords.

Use the following as the password:  #PW123#   

This will allow you to access the Configuration menu. Go immediately to the Advanced Setup menu and then to the Passwords menu.

You can enter a blank password, or enter a new password that you can remember. Once this is done you can proceed to your other tasks.

Overview:

This toolkit includes:

  • How to reduce boiler accidents
  • Best practices for optimizing pressure startup and combustion
  • How to accurately measure steam and carbon monoxide
  • The Top 3 things to consider in your boiler lifecycle
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    Información del Producto
    Overview:

    Come take a virtual visit into our manufacturing facility in Amersfoot, Netherlands.

    Overview:

    Yokogawa’s new TDLS8000 houses all of the industry’s leading features in one robust device. The platform design is for in situ measurements which negate the need for sample extraction and conditioning. The non-contacting sensor allows for a variety of process types including corrosive, abrasive and condensing. The first generation platform has been proven in many others for the measurements of O2, CO, CH4, NH3, H2O and many more NIR absorbing gases. This second generation platform has improved reliability and ease of installation and maintenance while still meeting or exceeding designed application demands.

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